Wellington Harbor

Wellington harbor has great places to eat, walk and shop. It has a boat painted with penguins and seals, each unique and personalized. (Do they each represent individual people?) It is a charming contrast to the military boats, yachts, working boats and ferries, a caution against taking ourselves too seriously. If the penguin-seal boat is not sufficient to deliver the message, there is the painted piano, the painted bollard (that thing you moor a ship to), and a graphic graphic explaining the location of the gentlemen’s loo.

This strikingly painted food truck below sells very popular street food called a fritter (but actually a kind of pancake) containing your choice of chopped abalone, a tiny fish called whitefish, or chopped mussels – specifically, green-lipped mussels. The fritter cake is served on white bread of the “wonder” sort that has been heavily buttered. The green-lipped mussel one is open-faced. I can testify to that because I ate one.

The national museum, called Te Papa Tongarewa (“Te papa” means “our place” in Maori) is on the harbor, too. It is attractive outside and inside, and costs $20 per person. It tries so very hard to tell the story of the Maori and the history of white settlement, so the walls are thick with signs. I won’t try to explain the Maori settlement or the British invasion, land theft and ethnic cleansing, since this is a blog not a book and I don’t know enough to get the facts and figures right. It is sufficient to note that the Maori, who arrived from Polynesia about 800 years ago, were nearly wiped out by the British, who arrived in 1840. The Maori wiped out the moa, the large flightless bird. The British nearly wiped out everything else, between the clear-cutting of forests and burning to create grazing fields and the introduction of everything from pinus radiata (California pines – which grow better in New Zealand than they do in California) to rats.

The objects below are Maori – a carved canoe, a piece of fabric, and a stone.


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